Time of Blood: #WritersReviews

Time of Blood Book 3 of the Witching Legacy

Written and illustrated by Robin Jarvis.

Cover by Nicolas Decort

Published by Egmont in July 2017.

256 pages in paperback including map and pictures.

 

horror, magic and a disturbing amount of glee . . .

Summary from Publisher’s Website

The sinister Mister Dark is more powerful than ever and has enslaved young Verne to his will. Can Lil save her best friend before their enemy unleashes his most audacious and insane plan yet? Even with the help of new, surprising allies – a witch, a mysterious man of many disguises and the secretive aufwaders beneath the cliff – all seems hopeless.

Whitby has never been a more frightening and dangerous place to live, and the murdered dead refuse to rest in peace.

What I appreciated about Time of Blood – and what you will love if that’s your sort of thing:

  • The appearance of real life historical people and the return of much-loved characters from earlier books. Please note it’s best to read¬† the books of the Witching Legacy in order.
  • However there are enough clues for the smart reader to cope, and these act as a recap if it’s been a while.
  • A sub-plot revolving around concerns about appearance – which many can identify with. This makes the weirdness easier to relate to.
  • Compelling sense of place. For those who know and love Whitby, there’s a wealth of references to enjoy.
  • Richness of language. This includes dialect, idiosyncratic turns of phrase, and period expressions. Decidedly not for lovers of spare, pared-back prose.
  • Humour. This is often verbal but some visual verging on slapstick. Not to mention general intoxication with the intricate, fast-moving plot.
  • Clever, resourceful yet credible young characters. Lil is a corker! Also the mix of old and young, real and supernatural¬† adds depth.
  • Structure: intense, hand-across-mouth moment exactly half way. 95% through and we reach the nadir for Lil. That makes it sound ‘staged’ ( which of course it is – with a nod to Mr Irving and Mr Stoker) – yet it works seamlessly as you read.
  • Plenty of both Gothic and Steampunk details – and a fair amount of unearthly goings-on. Not surprisingly, the publishers recommend a 11+ readership probably for the horror and violence, together with the complexity of language and plotting. Some younger readers will be OK though. It’s not unrelentingly grim.
  • The final revelation ( right at the last)¬† creates great intrigue for the fourth book Legacy of Witches yet to come . . .

I’d also highly recommend a look at Robin Jarvis’ own gallery to see how he pictures some of his cast. Here’s an example:

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *